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Nothing to See

384 pages
Paperback, 21 x 14.8 cm
Published March 2021
ISBN 9781925818680

Nothing to See

Pip Adam

Peggy and Greta are trying to get sober. They know almost nothing about the world: how to cook, how to shop, how to find a job. To fill time, they sort clothes at the Salvation Army shop, and attend daily support meetings. They seem to have no identity of their own – or rather, they appear to have only one identity between the two of them. Then, without warning, one of them is gone, and the other is left alone, trying to find her place in the world. But is it Peggy or Greta who is left? Is it someone else altogether?

Nothing to See is grounded in the details of everyday life, of sharehouses and workplaces, of substance abuse and sex, and of the emergence of new technologies that fill every facet of existence. Yet the women at its centre seem on the brink of disappearing altogether. Set across three decades, Pip Adam’s enigmatic, uncanny novel asks what it means to seek relief from shame and loneliness, to find care when the fabric of reality is ready to come apart.

A total masterpiece. Gripping, weird, funny, close to the bone. An intense portrait of sobriety, a mystery, a sci-fi novel, an urgent book about living in our panoptical present.Dan Kois

Wildly good…a fiery study in class and addiction and the boring exhausting grind of building a splintered life into something whole.Catherine Woulfe, The Spinoff

 

About the Author

Pip Adam

Pip Adam is the author of three novels: Nothing to See, The New Animals, which won the Acorn Foundation Prize for Fiction, and I’m Working on a Building, as well as the short story collection Everything We Hoped For, which won the NZSA Hubert Church Best First Book Award for Fiction.

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Related News

Nothing to See: Pip Adam in conversation with Laura Jean McKay

We’re glad to share the video of Pip Adam and Laura Jean McKay, author of the award-winning novel The Animals in That Country, in conversation about Nothing to See. Framing the novel as a meditation on care, they speak to themes of dividing and reforming, loss and loneliness, and embodied experiences of writing and reading.

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