Sean Rabin’s Wood Green shortlisted for the 2017 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award

Wood Green cover for webGiramondo author Sean Rabin has been shortlisted for the 2017 Victorian Premier’s Award for Fiction with his novel Wood Green set in a village on the slopes of Mt Wellington in Tasmania. Previously, the novel was shortlisted for The Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction. The novel is an exploration of the perils of literary ambition and the elusive prospect of artistic legacy.

Of this work, the judges said: Wood Green explores the relationship between art and life, and contains some illuminating passages about what it means to create art. Evoking the insularity of a small town life, it deals with its location and characters with warmth and humour. Suspense-fully plotted and cleverly narrated, Wood Green a book beyond categorisation – covering the domestic and the cosmopolitan, the pedestrian and the sublime, all with equal skill and authenticity.

To learn more about the shortlist, visit the Wheeler Centre website.

Lisa Gorton wins and Michael Farrell shortlisted for the 2016 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards

We are delighted to announce that Lisa Gorton has co-won the 2016 Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Fiction. Michael Farrell was also shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Poetry.

You can listen to Lisa’s chat about her award-winning book with the Books and Arts Daily podcast.

The Life of Houses_Lisa GortonJudges comments for The Life of Houses:

Lisa Gorton, in The Life of Houses, has written a highly original novel in which she has made the background of her narrative the foreground. She has taken a common place and made it mysterious and profound. Over a century ago the French novelist Gustave Flaubert said that he would like to write a book with no content, a book that was nothing but style. Lisa Gorton has gone some considerable way toward realising this essentially modernist ambition. She avoids all sensation, and the high points of her narrative all occur off stage, or are spoken of in the most low-key manner. These moments include a mother’s consideration of beginning an affair, a young girl’s failure to make a connection with a gay painter who is interested in her as a person, a ghost that never appears and the death of the girl’s grandfather. All these incidences, and others, typify what might be called the author’s contribution to the “a car went by” school of writing (walking to the beach one day it is noted that “a car went by” without any import or symbolism to this phrase).

While this is not a novel for every reader, those who enjoy observation will find it a book of exquisite precision. It is a work of realism taken to the point where that immemorial style is renewed for the modern reader. Some may remember the French novelist who caused a stir in the 1950s, Alain Robbe-Grillet, who concentrated on the physical objects informing his work. Like him, Lisa Gorton has written a book whose virtues are all in its details, but she has an unpretentious, clean and warm style which makes her remote from her similar predecessor.

Farrell_revJudges comments for Cocky’s Joy:

Michael Farrell’s Cocky’s Joy is a series of deliberate non-sequiturs, of phrases resonant yet unconnected to the words which have gone before, “slowly edging towards Babel in reverse”, as one poem puts it. “We see the world as a black and white golf course. Constellations like buttons on Apollinaire.” While such sentences, on the surface, make no sense, they are nonetheless suggestive of a particular mind at work. Many of the poems in this book are nothing more than lists of items that have been glimpsed in passing by that mind, or consciousness, and as such they help to create an inadvertent self-portrait of a person whose thoughts are endlessly curious, witty, literate, allusive, with a frame of references that range from the domestic to the cosmic, taking in both high culture and popular media on the way.

To see the full shortlists and other categories, visit the Department of Arts website.

Fiona Wright wins 2016 Queensland Literary Non-fiction Award

Fiona Wright has been awarded The University of Queensland Non-fiction Book Award for Small Acts of Disappearance: Essays on Hunger. Her collection of essays has also recently won the Kibble Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Stella Prize.

Of Small Acts of Disappearance, the judges said: ‘This is a brilliant albeit disturbing collection of essays by Fiona Wright about her long association with an illness experienced by many young people in our land of plenty. She refers to her eating disorder as hunger, and in so doing she re-frames this mysterious illness so that we as readers are better able to understand it. She unsparingly highlights the contradictions and deceptions inherent in the illness, and what she sees as the empowering and addictive effects of hunger. She references anorexic moments in books we’ve all read and probably missed, sobering indeed.’

To read more about this collection of essays, visit the website.

 

Lucy Dougan wins the 2016 WA Premier’s Poetry Award

The Guardians by Lucy Dougan has won the Western Australia Premier’s Award in the poetry category. The award ceremony took place at the State Library of Western Australia on 3 October.

Of the poetry collection, the judges said: ‘Seemingly simple, actually very dense poetry, Dougan’s elliptical work hints at a life that hovers just beyond our comprehension; in dreams, tales, the past, in the imagination of the poet. This other world surrounds even the most domestic of the poems. Often funny as well as serious, the work is at the same time mysterious and haunting.’

Read more about The Guardians on the website.

Alexis Wright wins the 2016 Kate Challis Award for The Swan Book

Alexis Wright has won the 2016 Kate Challis Award with her novel, The Swan Book.

In their citation the judges noted: ‘Alexis Wright’s The Swan Book is a sprawling, magnificent achievement, a remarkable imaginative vision of Australia as it was and is, and will be. Set at some point in the future, in a world utterly changed by global warming, war and the global movement of people, it charts the life of a mute young woman, Oblivian Ethel(ene), beginning with her fraught relationship with an old, enigmatic refugee, Bella Donna of the Champions. The novel is full of mythologies and soaring imagery: the swans, for example, are ever-present and say so much about the predicament of the world they inhabit. At the same time, the novel launches a devastating critique of Australia’s treatment of Indigenous people: condemning the Federal government’s Intervention, and showing us the many ways in which a militarised colonialism has shaped, and continues to shape, Indigenous lives in Australia’s north and across the nation.’

In 1994, Emeritus Professor Bernard Smith (late) established “The Kate Challis Award” to honour the memory of his late wife, Kate Challis, who was known in her youth as Ruth Adeney (RAKA is an acronym for the Ruth Adeney Koori Award). In the Pintupi language RAKA means ‘five’ and in the Warlpiri RDAKA means ‘hand’. The donor stipulated that the award be made annually and is to be applied to encourage Indigenous artists to undertake literary works, paintings, sculptures, craftwork, plays and musical compositions and to assist in advancing the recognition of Indigenous achievements in these areas.

To read more about the award, visit the website.

Ali Cobby Eckermann shortlisted for the 2016 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Indigenous Writing

Ali Cobby Eckermann’s collection of poems, Inside My Mother, is one of three titles shortlisted for the 2016 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Indigenous Writing. The winner of the $20,000 award will be announced on 7 September, coinciding with Indigenous Literacy Day.

Of Inside My Mother, the judges said:

Inside my Mother is a haunting and evocative piece of writing from an extraordinarily gifted poet. Ali Cobby Eckermann has produced a deeply personal set of poetic moments, which are both inventive and classical. A raw and honest collection cut from bitter experience, Inside My Mother sometimes reads like a verse novel – except these moments might be ripped from the pages of another person’s life.

There is great empathy in these poems. The title suggests a primal longing for the mother, who is embodied in the birth trees that populate the country of the poet’s mind. Those birth trees, like the surreal dream birds, are both witness and sentinel to generations of mothers and daughters. There is nothing anaesthetic about these poems; they are brutal and affirming in their truth.’

To read more about the shortlist, visit the Wheeler Centre website.

Sean Rabin’s Wood Green has been shortlisted for The Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction

Wood Green cover for webWood Green by Sean Rabin has been shortlisted for the 2016 Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction. Now in its third year, the aim of the award is to recognise ‘exciting and exceptional new contributions to local literature’.

On Wood Green the judges commented: ‘Set in Tasmania, this is a charming, quirky and very clever debut novel, bursting with literary references and boasting a memorable cast of characters. A genuine pleasure to read.’

The winning author will be announced at midday on Tuesday 18 October, be featured in the November issue of the Readings Monthly, and will receive prize money of $4000.

To read more about the prize, visit the Readings website.

Lucy Dougan and Jennifer Maiden shortlisted for 2016 WA Premier’s Poetry Award

Maiden and Dougan WA Poetry
Two Giramondo poets have been shortlisted for the 2016 Western Australian Premier’s Poetry Award: Lucy Dougan for The Guardians and Jennifer Maiden for The Fox Petition.

The judges said of The Guardians: ‘Seemingly simple, actually very dense poetry, Dougan’s elliptical work hints at a life that hovers just beyond our comprehension; in dreams, tales, the past, in the imagination of the poet. This other world surrounds even the most domestic of the poems. Often funny as well as serious, the work is at the same time mysterious and haunting.’

On The Fox Petition: ‘Mostly long, often conversational poems between well-known political or public figures, Maiden’s poetry is sharp, witty and entertaining. Its focus is on rights of all kinds and for her the poetry is definitely, and defiantly, the political. While it often uses historical figures, the work is always marked by its contemporary significance and broad historical relevance.’

The prize-winners will be announced on Monday 3 October 2016.

For more information visit the website.

Fiona Wright winner of $30 000 Kibble Literary Award

Small acts of disappearance_Fiona WrightWe are excited to announce that Fiona Wright has won the 2016 Nita B Kibble Literary Award for her collection of essays, Small Acts of Disappearance. The Award, which is worth $30 000, celebrates female writers and their impact on life writing.

The judges said:

“With the skilful use of language seen in her prize-winning poetry, Wright writes frankly and movingly about a difficult and very personal subject. Unlike many memoirs of illness and recovery, hers is not a story of triumph over adversity. The essay form allows her to resist closure, while also providing insights into her reading, her travels and her interactions with others,” she said.

For more information visit this site.

Martin Edmond’s Battarbee and Namatjira Shortlisted for National Biography Award

Battarbee and Namatjira_Martin EdmondWe’re excited that Battarbee and Namatjira by Martin Edmond has been shortlisted for the National Biography Award.

The Award was established in 1996 by Dr Geoffrey Cains and is administered and presented by the State Library of NSW.

The total prize value is $31,000 – $25,000 for the winner and $1,000 each for shortlisted authors – making it the richest national prize dedicated to Australian biographical writing and memoir.

The winner is announced each year in August.

For the complete shortlist, click here.

Fiona Wright Shortlisted for the Kibble Award

Small acts of disappearance_Fiona WrightWe’re delighted that Fiona Wright has been shortlisted for the Kibble Award for Established Writers for her essay collection Small Acts of Disappearance.

Established in 1994, the Kibble Awards recognise Australian female literary talent in honour of Nita Kibble, the first female librarian of the State Library of New South Wales. They comprise the Kibble Literary Award for an established author, as well as the Dobbie Literary Award for a first time published author.

For the complete shortlist, click here.

Joanne Burns and Lisa Gorton Winners of NSW Premier’s Literary Awards

We’re delighted that two Giramondo authors received awards at the 2016 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards.

joanne burns won the Kenneth Slessor Poetry Prize for brush of which the judges said: ‘While apparently modest in scope this intrepid and original poetry’s achievement is considerable as the commonplace is excavated in all its multifarious dimensions.’

Lisa Gorton was awarded the People’s Choice Prize for The Life of Houses.

For the full list of winners and judges’ citations, click here.

Giramondo Authors Shortlisted for NSW Premier’s Literary Awards

We are delighted to have so many authors shortlisted for this year’s NSW Premier’s Literary Awards.  

Christina Stead Prize for Fiction
Lisa Gorton The Life of Houses

Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-fiction
Fiona Wright Small Acts of Disappearance

Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry
joanne burns brush

Indigenous Writers’ Prize
Ali Cobby Eckermann Inside my Mother

For a full list of shortlisted titles, click here.

Fiona Wright Shortlisted for the Stella Prize

Small acts of disappearance_Fiona Wright

We’re thrilled that Fiona Wright’s Small Acts of Disappearancehas been shortlisted for the Stella Prize.

The judges say:
Small Acts of Disappearance is a collection of essays on anorexia, a disorder as disturbing as it is mysterious, even to its own sufferers. Documenting Fiona Wright’s experience from the beginning of her affliction, when she was a student, to her hospitalisation with a life-threateningly extreme version of the illness, the essays display a candour and an intelligence that describe the course of her illness with great precision and illuminate the sufferer’s motives and actions over time.

The narrative is crosshatched with other experiences and subjects: travel, autobiography, and literature – in particular writers who have used their art to anatomise the extremity of compulsion. The range of Wright’s research, from contemporary neurobiologists to old school modernists, and the quality of her insights make Small Acts of Disappearance a valuable book. Wright brings a sometimes melancholy, sometimes comic, well-informed honesty to an important subject.’

For the full shortlist, click here.

Judith Beveridge shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards 2015

Beveridge Devadatta's Poems cover draftWe’re thrilled that Judith Beveridge’s poetry collection, Devadatta’s Poems, has been shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards 2015. For a full list of shortlisted titles, click here.

Queensland Literary Awards Shortlistings

Lucy DouganWe are delighted to have two authors shortlisted for the Queensland Literary Awards.

Lucy Dougan’s The Guardians has been shortlisted for the Judith Wright Calanthe Poetry Prize and Nicholas Jose’s Bapo has been shortlisted for the Steele Rudd Short Story Prize.

For the full shortlist and winners, click here.

Felicity Castagna chosen for IBBY Australia Honour List

TiHan cover for webWe’re thrilled that Felicity Castagna’s The Incredible Here and Now has been chosen at IBBY Australia’s Honour Book for Writing.

Of Felicity’s work, the judges said:

Dom dies in a car accident. Fifteen-year-old Michael has to learn how to live without his older brother, whose easy charm could open any doors. In this life-changing year, while his mother withdraws from the family, Michael, despite his strong sense of self, becomes somehow disconnected from his world. This gives the story an edgy feel as we experience with him his neighbourhood, his girlfriend and the cars which zoom up and down the street. The novel has a powerful sense of place, exploring the setting and cultures of the western suburbs of Sydney that many readers can identify with. Castagna’s sharp, observant writing shows compassion and insight and explores the themes of grief, loss, romance, culture and family life through a series of vignettes. Many light touches of humour contribute to making this compelling and accessible book a story about hope and finding one’s place in the community.

For more information about IBBY Australia, click here.

Alexis Wright Awarded a Sidney Myer Creative Fellowship

Alexis Wright authorWe are delighted that Alexis Wright has been awarded a Sidney Myer Creative Fellowship.

First awarded in 2011, the Sidney Myer Creative Fellowships provide grants of $160,000 over two years to individual artists, arts managers and thought leaders in the humanities. For more information on the fellowships and other recipients, click here.

Jennifer Maiden awarded ALS Gold Medal

Alexis Wright authorWe are delighted that Alexis Wright has been awarded a Sidney Myer Creative Fellowship.

First awarded in 2011, the Sidney Myer Creative Fellowships provide grants of $160,000 over two years to individual artists, arts managers and thought leaders in the humanities. For more information on the fellowships and other recipients, click here.

Judith Beveridge Awarded Peter Porter Poetry Prize

We’re thrilled that Judith Beveridge has been awarded the Peter Porter Poetry Prize for her work, ‘As Wasps Fly Upwards’.

On winning the prize, Judith said:

I am deeply honoured to have won the Peter Porter Poetry Prize, not only because of the high regard I have for Peter Porter’s poetry and for Australian Book Review, but also because of the very strong 2015 shortlist. I loved all the poems and was truly surprised to hear I’d won. My sincere thanks to ABR for continuing this prestigious prize, which is a great support for poets.

For more information on the shortlisted poems, visit the ABR website, here.

Luke Carman wins NSW Premier’s New Writing Award 2015

Carman-CoverWe are delighted that Luke Carman has won the UTS Glenda Adams New Writing Award 2015 at the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards.

The judges had this to say of Luke’s work:

Luke Carman’s witty collection of stories heralds a new, edgy and brilliant voice in Australian fiction. The elegant young man of the title is a well-read, acerbic character who goes by the name of Luke Carman. Immediately the writer’s erudition and craft are on display. Here we have a portrait of the artist as a young western Sydney man, failing repeatedly the machismo tests set by the street thugs and dealers of suburbs with the postcode 2170.

Through his unpretentious, playful stream-of-consciousness, the protagonist charts his own odyssey from Liverpool Boys High and the western suburbs to the more genteel, sophisticated inner west. Carman offers a cartography of the multiracial — and at times violent and drug-and-booze fuelled — neighbourhoods of western Sydney, and a map of the protagonist’s reading life. Kerouac, Ginsberg, Tolstoy, Whitman, Dylan Thomas and Hemingway sit alongside Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Henry Rollins, Seinfeld and Penthouse.

Carman’s epigrammatic stories, so perfectly suited to Giramondo’s Shorts form, build in intensity and poignancy. After a rollicking, sometimes brazen and shocking romp through fraught geographical, cultural and racial terrain, we are left with the almost nostalgic suggestion that perhaps there can be no more true heroes – no great Ulysses – in our modern world. But, Carman suggests, you should not let that get you down. An Elegant Young Man shocks, delights, depresses and inspires.

For a full list of winners, click here.

Michael Mohammed Ahmad, SMH Best Young Novelist 2015, Voss Prize Shortlisting

Ahmad The Tribe Cover
We’re thrilled that Michael Mohammed Ahmad has been named one of the Sydney Morning Herald’s Best Young Novelists, 2015, for his book The Tribe. The judges said:

Ahmad tackles this difficult subject matter with breathtaking honesty, gesturing towards a larger social canvas beyond the mind of a child that includes the struggle of migration, economic disadvantage, the difficulties of reconciling elements of the old and the new culture. Ahmad’s language is replete with lyricism, and a sense of wonder suffuses every page. It turns everyday experience into the stuff of poetry.

For full details of the winners, click here. The Tribe has been shortlisted for the Voss Literary Prize. The prize is dedicated to the memory of Vivian Robert de Vaux Voss (1930-1963), an historian and lover of literature. His will stipulated that a literary award be established to reward the best work of fiction from the previous year. For more information and the full shortlist, click here.

Alan Wearne Honoured with Christopher Brennan Award

wearne headshot

We are thrilled that Alan Wearne has been lauded with the FAW Christopher Brennan Award. The award celebrates lifetime achievement in poetry and recognises a poet who produces work of ‘sustained quality and distinction’.

Judges Jennifer Harrison and Philip Salom had this to say in their citation:

Alan Wearne has been involved with the Australian poetry scene since the late sixties. After publishing two poetry collections, Public Relations (1972) and New Devil, New Parish (1976), he played a pivotal role in introducing the verse novel to mainstream Australian poetry with Out Here (1976) and The Nightmarkets (1986). The Nightmarkets won the Banjo Award and was adapted for performance. Wearne wrote a satirical novel on Melbourne’s football (Kicking in Danger 1997) and hosted Conversations with a Dead Poet — a documentary film on his friend the late poet John Forbes — before his next verse novel was published. That verse novel, The Lovemakers (2001), was awarded the 2002 NSW Premier’s (Kenneth Slessor) Prize for Poetry, NSW Book of the Year and the Arts Queensland Judith Wright Calanthe Award. The Lovemakers, Book Two was the co-winner of the 2004 Foundation for Australian
Literary Studies’ Colin Roderick Award. Alan Wearne’s most recent works are Sarsparilla: a Calypso (2007), The Australian Popular Songbook (2008) and Prepare the Cabin for Landing (2012). He is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Wollongong and publisher at Grand Parade Poets.

For a full list of winners and citations, click here.

Giramondo Titles Shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Award 2015

NSW prem's 2015

Giramondo is delighted to be well represented across three categories of the NSW Premier’s Literary Award 2015 shortlists.

In the Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry, Judith Beveridge’s Devadatta’s Poems and John Mateer’s Unbelievers or the Moor made the shortlist.

Michael Mohammed Ahmad’s The Tribe and Luke Carman’s An Elegant Young Man have been shortlisted for the UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing.

A Million Windows by Gerald Murnane has been shortlisted for the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction.

For a full list of shortlisted authors, click here.

For the full citations of all the Giramondo titles, click here.

Felicity Castagna wins the Prime Minister’s Literary Award

TiHan cover for web

We are thrilled that Felicity Castagna has won the Prime Minister’s Literary Award, Young Adult Fiction for her work The Incredible Here and Now. The award was presented at a gala dinner in Melbourne. For the full list of winners and shortlisted titles, click here.

SBS broadcast the event, to watch the video, click here.

The judges said:

When Michael’s beloved older brother Dom dies in a car crash, Michael and his family are left with aching grief. What an aptly titled novel this is: a vivid portrait of a teenage boy, his family and community in Sydney’s western suburbs learning about life, death and love. Writer Felicity Castagna exploits a series of vignettes to create a wholly satisfying, moving story: its short, sculpted chapters capture Michael’s thoughts, moods and insights in quickening moments. Michael has the outward reticence of a teenage boy, but so much happening beneath the surface. This is a splendid portrayal of a boy on the cusp.

Brian Castro Wins Patrick White Award

We’re delighted that Brian Castro has won the Patrick White Literary Award. This award is for an author’s body of work and was founded by White with the proceeds of his Nobel Prize for Literature. Giramondo has published four of Castro’s works, Shanghai Dancing, The Garden Book, The Bath Fugues and Street to Street.

The judges praised Castro for his ‘outstanding contribution to Australian Literature, his continued willingness to take imaginative risks and be ‘blackly playful’, and his evident potential to produce more significant work…’

For the full judges’ citation, click here.

To read Castro’s acceptance speech, click here.

Felicity Castagna shortlisted for Prime Minister’s Award

TiHan cover for web
We’re delighted that Felicity Castagna’s The Incredible Here and Now has been shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Award, Young Adult Fiction. (For the full shortlist, click here) This follows on from her shortlisting on the CBCA Award Older Reader category and the NSW Premier’s Literary Award, Young Adult category.

Michael Mohammed Ahmad and Luke Carman Shortlisted for Readings New Writing Award

We’re thrilled that Michael Mohammed Ahmad’s book The Tribe and Luke Carman’s An Elegant Young Man have been shortlisted for the inaugural Readings New Writing Award. A prize offered for a first or second book by an Australian author, the award ‘aims to increase the promotion and commercial success of books by Australian authors, earning them greater recognition from the wider community’.

Ahmad The Tribe Cover
Of The Tribe, the judges said:

Told from the point of view of a child called Bani, The Tribe introduces the members of a Muslim family who fled to Australia just before the civil war in Lebanon, and the narrative progresses through key moments of their multi-generational household.

Set largely in the western Sydney suburb of Lakemba, The Tribe comes to life through the simple, honest voice of its young narrator. The suburban narrative is given a vivid cultural specificity not often depicted in contemporary Australian fiction, and Michael Mohammed Ahmad cleverly ties pop-cultural references to myth and traditional stories, creating rifts of humour and warmth in the work.

Carman-Cover
The judges said that of  An Elegant Young Man:

Luke Carman’s collection of monologues and anecdotal stories hums with the cadence of Western Sydney – a creative mash-up of street talk and literature, swagger and trepidation, colloquialisms and poetry. The world of Fobs, Lebbos, Greek, Serbs, Grubby Boys and scumbag Aussies that forms the backdrop to these stories is ominously familiar; a place where racism is so entrenched in daily interactions as to be barely discernible.

Through his narrator, described as anything but an elegant young man, Carman brilliantly captures the mingling anxieties and misplaced confidences of youth with a feverish intensity.

 

For the full shortlist, click here.

Lisa Gorton Awarded Philip Hodgins Medal

Gorton-cover
At the Mildura Writers’ Festival this year, Lisa Gorton was awarded the Philip Hodgins Memorial Medal, an annual prize given to an Australian writer whose work reflects the standards and literary accomplishments that Philip Hodgins. Gorton’s most recent book published by Giramondo is Hotel Hyperion which has been shortlisted for the WA Premier’s Literary Award for Poetry.

Alexis Wright wins the ALS Gold Medal

Wright-Swan-coverAlexis Wright has been awarded the 2014 Australian Literature Society Gold Medal for The Swan Book.

The judges’ citation said:

Alexis Wright’s The Swan Book is a novel of serious political intent concerning the migration of stories, peoples, imaginations and cultures. Wright’s remarkable third novel is rightfully angry, necessarily challenging, deeply personal, and universally damning. The central plot line of The Swan Book follows the story of Oblivion Ethyl(ene), or Oblivia, a mute teenage girl who is the victim of a gang rape in her displaced and army-controlled Indigenous community. The narrative style is an extension of Wright’s Carpentaria, blending many dimensions and registers simultaneously; The Swan Book is satirical, humorous, folkloric, mythical, magical and scathing, and combines the literal and the metaphoric with virtuosic skill. The logic with which Wright connects some of the most pressing political issues of our time – Indigenous rights, intervention, climate change, refugee policy – is compelling, and her projection of these issues into a dystopian future reveals both their messiness and their urgency.

Luke Carman’s An Elegant Young Man was also shortlisted for the 2014 Australian Literature Society Gold Medal.

The Recluse Shortlisted for the Magarey Medal

juers-265x300We’re delighted that The Recluse, Evelyn Juers, has been shortlisted for the Magarey Medal.

The Magarey Medal for biography is a biennial prize of at least $10,000. The prize is awarded to the female author who has published the work judged to be the best biographical writing on an Australian subject in the preceding two years. The awarding of the prize is administered and judged by a panel set up by the Association for the Study of Australian Literature and the Australian Historical Association. The prize is very generously donated by Professor Emerita Susan Magarey.

For the full shortlist, click here.

Luke Carman – 2014 Sydney Morning Herald Best Young Novelist

luke plus book

Photo: Peter Rae, Fairfax

We’re delighted that Luke Carman has been named one of the Sydney Morning Herald‘s Best Young Novelists in 2014 for An Elegant Young Man.

The judges said that ‘Carman’s prose blends literature and popular culture, punk and poetry, and transforms this rich seam of influence into his own contagious voice with an admirable disregard for the distinctions of high and low art.’

In her interview, Linda Morris uncovered that:

Originally Luke Carman’s An Elegant Young Man carried the title How to Be Gay, which was his neighbour’s suggested title when Carman first revealed he wanted to be a writer.

The mocking, says Carman, sums up the sharp edges of masculine culture in western Sydney and the fact that literature carries so little credibility in suburbia. Which was unfortunate for Carman as a nerdy kid with a head for books not boxing gloves. At six or seven he used to read as a form of self-defence to keep his night terrors at bay. Reading eventually gave him insomnia.

In this collection of short stories and monologues, Carman wanders the streets of Granville, Mount Pritchard and Liverpool, observing fist fights under street lights, showdowns at all-night kebab shops and girls who offer their love for the cheapest exchange.

For the full coverage, click here.

Congratulations Alexis Wright – The Swan Book shortlisted for the Miles Franklin

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Left to right: Cory Taylor, Fiona McFarlane, Alexis Wright
Photo: Janie Barrett, Fairfax Media

The Swan Book by Alexis Wright has been shortlisted for the 2014 Miles Franklin Awards. In their citation, the judges said

 At some future date, in an Australia ravaged by the effects of climate change, the first Aboriginal Prime Minister, Warren Finch (aka ‘god’s gift’), takes his ‘promise wife’, Oblivia Ethylene, from her home in the far north to live in a tower in a flooded and lawless southern city. On this scaffolding Alexis Wright builds her extraordinary novel, an epic, mythic and satirical tale that is a worthy successor to her previous prize-winning Carpentaria (2006).

Oblivia, who was gang raped as a child and cannot speak, is the guardian of the swans, which are the book’s presiding image of beauty and vulnerability. Oblivia’s guardians, in turn, are Aunty Bella Donna – a climate change refugee from Europe, who brings the girl to live with her, feeding her with swan stories from around the world – and an Aboriginal elder who calls himself the Harbourmaster.

The name of their dwelling place, Swan Lake, as well as the name of the Aboriginal elder’s pet monkey, Rigoletto, signal the witty mix of cultural icons that furnish Wright’s tale with global as well as local references. The narrative voice that Alexis Wright has crafted can span the languages of opera and popular song as well as rendering the rhythms and idioms of Aboriginal English – a complex, allusive narrative of speaking, singing, mourning and cracking jokes. The result is unlike anything we have heard before in Australian literature.

For the full citation, click here.

You can view the full shortlist here.

Judith Beveridge Honoured with the Christopher Brennan Award

Devadatta's Poems Beveridge HeadshotJudith Beverdige has received the FAW CHRISTOPHER BRENNAN AWARD. It is an award to honour an Australian poet who has written work of sustained quality and distinction.

The FAW supplies a specially-cast bronze plaque designed by Michael Meszaros. Each year, the recipient is selected by a panel of judges appointed by the FAW. Previous winners include Giramondo poets Fay Zwicky and Jennifer Maiden.

Beveridge’s latest book of poetry is Devadatta’s Poems, available here.

NSW Premier’s Shortlist 2014 – Castagna, Middleton and Wright

nsw prems shortlist 2014
We’re pleased to have three titles shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards. You can read the judges’ comments below.

 

Ephemeral Waters, Kate Middleton

Judges’ comments:
‘This long documentary poem tracks the Colorado River, a system in ecological crisis, in its entirety, as a geographical site and as a self-sustaining historical text. Ambitious and epic in scope – and reminiscent of William Carlos Williams’ ‘Paterson’, Eleni Sikelianos’ ‘The California Poem’, and of Laurie Duggan’s ‘The Ash Range’ – it is a comprehensive work of research, a record of the poet’s actual journeys along the river’s course, and an inspiring act of imagination.

Ephemeral Waters stimulates questions about the local versus the global, and what a poem of this scope would achieve if it were about the Murray River. This book encourages a reader to ask what the future would be like if such river systems collapsed entirely. In this way a poem set in the US speaks directly to Australian readers without didacticism. Kate Middleton manages to balance the emotive connection of people to land, and the contestation over land use, with a language that is empirical and occasionally minimal. Elsewhere the poetry is wonderfully eccentric in its cascading lineation. Its vocabulary is organic and analytic in its weaving of local American vernaculars, scientific nomenclature, and lyric phrasing. The book achieves a rich synthesis of the literary and mythological with the empirical matter-of-factness of the surveyor’s documents, observations and explorations of science and history, both natural and human. Kate Middleton’s very accomplished second book is a major tribute to an important river that so many depend upon.’

 

The Incredible Here and Now, Felicity Castagna

Judges’ comments:
‘The Incredible Here and Now might be a book about the demonised and the stereotyped, about powerlessness and the hidden injuries of class. It might be a book about protest masculinity and the senseless, foolish, sometimes dangerous things young men do to compensate for the experience of marginalization. It might be a book about death and grief, or a book about the excruciating and exhilarating awkwardness of first love. In fact, The Incredible Here and Now is about all these things.

In the summer he turns 15, Michael’s world threatens to implode when his “invincible” older brother dies. Grief-stricken, bored, aimless and confused, Michael seeks refuge in the streets, sites and people of his home, Western Sydney. It would have been easy to stray into melodrama or sentimentality, but The Incredible Here and Now pulls back just enough to allow Castagna to deliver a confident and well-controlled story. Elegantly crafted as a series of vignettes, Castagna’s writing is bold, compassionate and visceral. Her characters are real and flawed, and linger long after one has turned the final page – from the charming and exuberant Dom, to “the last man on earth” Shadi, to the tyrannical Mr Alloshi. But it is Western Sydney that perhaps leaves the most memorable impression on the reader. Vividly portrayed – “an everywhere-people kind of place” – Castagna humanises a place where “those who don’t know any better drive through the neighbourhood and lock their doors”. It is in the West where Michael ultimately finds hope, resilience and love, learning that “you can’t go back. There’s only moving forward”.’

 

The Swan Book, Alexis Wright.

Judges’ comments:
‘Set in the future in a post-climate-change apocalypse, The Swan Book is the story of a mute Aboriginal girl, Oblivion Ethyl(ene). Hauled from her burrow in the roots of a tree as a child, traumatised by rape, Oblivia is saved by the European émigré-crone, Bella Donna of the Champions. Driven from her own land by environmental catastrophe, Bella Donna fills Oblivia’s mind with epic legends of migratory swans, and soon the foetid swamp of their home begins to bristle with the arrival of thousands of black swans, drawn inexorably towards Oblivia. Then comes another emissary from distant lands: Warren Finch, soon to be Australia’s first Aboriginal president, come to claim Oblivia as his promised wife.

This wildly adventurous, operatic hallucination of a novel encompasses indigenous politics, climate change, European history, global migration, displacement and grief. It is a savage critique of contemporary government approaches to indigenous culture, achieved through its telescopic imagination, sly humour and soaring poetry. Sweeping through history, across continents and cultures – yet never losing touch with the grit of raw experience – The Swan Book is a work of thrilling ambition.’

 

You can view the full list of shortlisted titles here.

As a special offer, you can purchase all three shortlisted titles for the amazing price $60, including postage in Australia.

CBCA Shortlist – The Incredible Here and Now

TiHan cover for webWe are delighted that The Incredible Here and Now by Felicity Castagna has been shortlisted for the Children’s Book Council of Australia Awards in the Older Readers category.

Teacher resources and reading group notes can be found here.

To view all of the shortlisted titles, click here.

The Swan Book – Longlisted for the Miles Franklin, Shortlisted for the Stella

Wright-Swan-cover

The Swan Book continues to attract critical acclaim as it has been longlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award 2014.

For the full list of longlisted titles, click here.

The Swan Book has also been shortlisted for the Stella Prize. The judges said:

A hundred years into the future, when climate change has irreparably damaged the earth, a refugee from the frozen northern hemisphere called Bella Donna finds a mute teenage girl she names Oblivia and takes her to live with her on an old derelict warship in a dry, polluted swamp in northern Australia. Three new figures appear: a black swan, an Aboriginal elder who looks like Mick Jagger, and an archangel in a white Commodore. These five creatures anchor Alexis Wright’s brilliantly surreal and inventive novel about imagination and the power of story. It’s a  treasure chest of stories, fables, songs, myths and poems, containing a wealth of cultural references from across the globe. The Swan Book is also a furious and impassioned political fable, linking the fate of Aboriginal Australia to the trajectory of unstoppable global warming and employing the fathomless complexity of the living Aboriginal relationship to country as a way of exploring humanity’s connection to the earth.

If Wright’s last novel Carpentaria – the winner of the 2007 Miles Franklin Literary Award – was operatic in its scope and language, then The Swan Bookis even more so. Rich and deep in its imagery, fearless in its linguistic acrobatics and sweeping in its imaginative power, The Swan Book is at once a futuristic dystopia, a gorgeous artifact, and an urgent call to action.

For the full shortlist, click here.

To buy your copy, and find reading group notes and reviews, click here.

Alexis Wright and Luke Carman shortlisted for the ALS Gold Medal

als shortlisters

 

We’re thrilled to have two titles shortlisted for the 2013 Australian Literature Society Gold Medal.

Alexis Wright, The Swan Book
Luke Carman, An Elegant Young Man

The ALS Gold Medal is awarded annually for an outstanding literary work in the preceding calendar year. The medal was inaugurated in the 1920s by the Australian Literature Society, which was founded in Melbourne in 1899.

Liquid Nitrogen Wins Victorian Prize for Literature

maiden-coverWe’re delighted that Liquid Nitrogen by Jennifer Maiden was awarded the prize in the poetry category of the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards and also the overall prize, The Victorian Prize for Literature.

You can view the judges’ report here.

Read Gig Ryan’s in-depth review for the Sydney Review of Books here.

Jason Steger’s coverage of the prize for the Age can be found here.

Three Giramondo authors shortlisted for the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards

We are delighted to have three authors on the shortlist this year for the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards.

Fiction

The Swan Book, Alexis Wright

The judges described The Swan Book as:

A work of metaphysical and metaphorical originality, Wright has created a world where communication flows between ghosts, animals and humans, but it’s also frighteningly realistic, holding a mirror to the nation, allowing fiction to speak a truth about Indigenous issues that many Australian find difficult to confront. For all its gravity, though, it is wickedly funny, mocking the ‘realms of public sector abstract dialogue’, and it deepens the reader’s understanding of this ancient continent.

Poetry

Autoethnographic, Michael Brennan

Of Autoethnographic the judges said:

Brennan’s poems skate over the narrator’s plural and imagined pasts in unpredictable tones, echoing and vital. As autoethnography itself places the personal in the wider politicised world, so Brennan creates an un-unified un-stabilised life rendered through many lives, a cubist portrait of self / selves in vivid excursions through a mythologised yet recognisably contemporary era.

Liquid Nitrogen, Jennifer Maiden

In their citation, the judges wrote:

This book is explorative, not didactic, and these long poetical essays are studded with interruptions, repetitions of motifs and characters, and tangential obsessions that create a distinct world and rhythm, where art and politics insistently coalesce in vibrant tableaux. A brilliantly fertile imagination creates poetry that interrogates and refines thought.

For the full citations and the complete shortlist, click here.

All Giramondo Shorts now $19.95

nonfict-shortsNow all the Giramondo Shorts titles are available for the excellent price of $19.95 including postage. For a full list of the Shorts titles, click here.

carman berryAs a Christmas offer, you pick up the two latest Shorts, Ninety 9 by Vanessa Berry and An Elegant Young Man by Luke Carman for the special price of $35 including postage.

Liquid Nitrogen Shortlisted for the Griffin Poetry Prize

We are thrilled that Jennifer Maiden’s Liquid Nitrogen has been shortlisted for the Griffin International Poetry Prize.

The full judge’s citation reads:

Jennifer Maiden’s Liquid Nitrogen may very well be the most contemporary collection of poetry you’ll ever read. Over the course of these dense, obsessive, and allegorical long poems, Maiden has created an absurdist theatre of global politics in which the spirits of public figures from across the last century share the stage with politicians, terrorists, dissidents and fictional creations from our continuous present. Combining a free-wheeling, meditative style with crisp, lucidly elegant lines, Maiden’s philosophical verse investigates the poetics of narrativity itself, not only as mediated by the news on TV, but by the no-less ethically charged realm of art as well. An extended meditation on the uses and abuses of power, the moral gravity of Liquid Nitrogen is buoyed throughout by Maiden’s self-effacing sense of humor and her tenderness towards her grown daughter, Katherine, who stands at the heart of this collection. Epic in its scope and utterly eccentric in its approach, Liquid Nitrogen is a work of rare passion and unprecedented poetic achievement from one of Australia’s most prominent living writers, ‘alert to the point of twitching,’ like the ox to whom she likens herself on page one, who nevertheless ‘still tramples through the difficult.’ Suzanne Buffam

The other shortlisted books are:

Like a Straw Bird It Follows Me, and Other Poems Fady Joudah, translated from the Arabic, written by Ghassan Zaqtan

Night of the Republic, Alan Shapiro

Our Andromeda Brenda Shaughnessy

For full details, visit the Griffin Prize website here.

Gerald Murnane Special Offer – Inland

murnane_2Gerald Murnane is one of Australia’s most important living writers whose idiosyncratic and finely wrought fictions are capturing the attention of a new generation of readers.

Buy the newly republished Inland and receive two classic Murnane titles published by Giramondo for the special price of $60.

This discount of over 30% will get you Inland, Tamarisk Row and Invisible Yet Enduring Lilacs and includes free postage.

Poetry Pick ‘n’ Mix

poetry pick mix updated To celebrate the excellent poetry titles we have published in the last twelve months we are offering any three of our five most recent poetry titles for the special price of $45 with free postage in Australia. This discount of over 40% is for a limited time only.

The titles offered for this special selection are:

Unbelievers or ‘The Moor’, John Mateer

Ephemeral Waters, Kate Middleton

New Works on Paper, Luke Beesley

Goad Omen, Corey Wakeling

Hotel Hyperion, Lisa Gorton

Please return to this page to place your order.

Please specify in the comments/special instructions field at the checkout which three titles you would like to purchase.

Fill Your Stockings with Shorts

nonfict-shortsFor the book lover in your life, we’re offering a special Christmas discount on our Shorts series. Pick up three fiction titles – Anguli Ma by Chi Vu, Street to Street by Brian Castro and Varamo by Cesar Aira – for $50 with free postage.

Or for the non-fiction fan, we’re offering Eliot Weinberger’s Wildlife, Evelyn Juers’ The Recluse and Michael Wilding’s Wild and Woolley for $50 with free postage.

Please select from the drop-down menu below whether you would like the fiction or non-fiction pack.

To view the full series, click here.

Gig Ryan wins the NSW Premier’s Literary Award for Poetry

Gig Ryan’s New and Selected Poems was awarded the NSW Premier’s Literary Award for poetry. The judges described the collection as ‘uncompromising, intelligent and sophisticated’. For the full citation, click here.

John Mateer’s Southern Barbarians was shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards.

Jess Huon’s The Dark Wet was shortlisted in the inaugural Underrated Book of the Year Award.

Fiona Wright has been awarded the Dame Mary Gilmore Award for Knuckled. The decision was a unanimous verdict on the excellence of this collection. You can read the judges’ citation here.

We’re delighted that Gerald Murnane’s A History of Books and John Mateer’s Southern Barbarians have been shortlisted for the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards 2012.

In more good news, we’re thrilled that Kate Fagan has been shortlisted for the Age Book of the Year Awards for her collection First Light.

Earlier in 2012 we had two poetry collections nominated for the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards 2012. Gig Ryan’s New and Selected Poems and John Mateer’s Southern Barbarians. For more information and the full shortlist, click here.

Giramondo eBooks available now

 

Selected Giramondo titles are now available as eBooks, and can be purchased through (in alphabetical order):

AmazonBooki.shFishpond, iBooks, KoboEbooks.comEbrary, Netlibrary, Read How You WantOverdriveReadCloud

The digital editions offered are:

Brian Castro’s Street to Street

Alike Melike Ülgezer’s The Memory of Salt

Jess Huon’s The Dark Wet

Gerald Murnane’s Barley Patch and A History of Books

Evelyn Juers’ House of Exile

Tom Cho’s Look Who’s Morphing

Sara Knox’s The Orphan Gunner

Alexis Wright’s Carpentaria

Mireille Juchau’s Burning In

Brian Castro’s The Garden Book

Nick Jose’s Original Face and

John Hughes’ The Idea of Home

We are developing our digital publishing program. If there are any titles you would like to read on your device, please email Alice, alicegATgiramondopublishingDOTcom.

Sean Rabin’s Wood Green shortlisted for the 2017 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award

Wood Green cover for webGiramondo author Sean Rabin has been shortlisted for the 2017 Victorian Premier’s Award for Fiction with his novel Wood Green set in a village on the slopes of Mt Wellington in Tasmania. Previously, the novel was shortlisted for The Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction. The novel is an exploration of the perils of literary ambition and the elusive prospect of artistic legacy.

Of this work, the judges said: Wood Green explores the relationship between art and life, and contains some illuminating passages about what it means to create art. Evoking the insularity of a small town life, it deals with its location and characters with warmth and humour. Suspense-fully plotted and cleverly narrated, Wood Green a book beyond categorisation – covering the domestic and the cosmopolitan, the pedestrian and the sublime, all with equal skill and authenticity.

To learn more about the shortlist, visit the Wheeler Centre website.

Lisa Gorton wins and Michael Farrell shortlisted for the 2016 Prime Minister’s Literary Awards

We are delighted to announce that Lisa Gorton has co-won the 2016 Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Fiction. Michael Farrell was also shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Poetry.

You can listen to Lisa’s chat about her award-winning book with the Books and Arts Daily podcast.

The Life of Houses_Lisa GortonJudges comments for The Life of Houses:

Lisa Gorton, in The Life of Houses, has written a highly original novel in which she has made the background of her narrative the foreground. She has taken a common place and made it mysterious and profound. Over a century ago the French novelist Gustave Flaubert said that he would like to write a book with no content, a book that was nothing but style. Lisa Gorton has gone some considerable way toward realising this essentially modernist ambition. She avoids all sensation, and the high points of her narrative all occur off stage, or are spoken of in the most low-key manner. These moments include a mother’s consideration of beginning an affair, a young girl’s failure to make a connection with a gay painter who is interested in her as a person, a ghost that never appears and the death of the girl’s grandfather. All these incidences, and others, typify what might be called the author’s contribution to the “a car went by” school of writing (walking to the beach one day it is noted that “a car went by” without any import or symbolism to this phrase).

While this is not a novel for every reader, those who enjoy observation will find it a book of exquisite precision. It is a work of realism taken to the point where that immemorial style is renewed for the modern reader. Some may remember the French novelist who caused a stir in the 1950s, Alain Robbe-Grillet, who concentrated on the physical objects informing his work. Like him, Lisa Gorton has written a book whose virtues are all in its details, but she has an unpretentious, clean and warm style which makes her remote from her similar predecessor.

Farrell_revJudges comments for Cocky’s Joy:

Michael Farrell’s Cocky’s Joy is a series of deliberate non-sequiturs, of phrases resonant yet unconnected to the words which have gone before, “slowly edging towards Babel in reverse”, as one poem puts it. “We see the world as a black and white golf course. Constellations like buttons on Apollinaire.” While such sentences, on the surface, make no sense, they are nonetheless suggestive of a particular mind at work. Many of the poems in this book are nothing more than lists of items that have been glimpsed in passing by that mind, or consciousness, and as such they help to create an inadvertent self-portrait of a person whose thoughts are endlessly curious, witty, literate, allusive, with a frame of references that range from the domestic to the cosmic, taking in both high culture and popular media on the way.

To see the full shortlists and other categories, visit the Department of Arts website.

Fiona Wright wins 2016 Queensland Literary Non-fiction Award

Fiona Wright has been awarded The University of Queensland Non-fiction Book Award for Small Acts of Disappearance: Essays on Hunger. Her collection of essays has also recently won the Kibble Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Stella Prize.

Of Small Acts of Disappearance, the judges said: ‘This is a brilliant albeit disturbing collection of essays by Fiona Wright about her long association with an illness experienced by many young people in our land of plenty. She refers to her eating disorder as hunger, and in so doing she re-frames this mysterious illness so that we as readers are better able to understand it. She unsparingly highlights the contradictions and deceptions inherent in the illness, and what she sees as the empowering and addictive effects of hunger. She references anorexic moments in books we’ve all read and probably missed, sobering indeed.’

To read more about this collection of essays, visit the website.

 

Lucy Dougan wins the 2016 WA Premier’s Poetry Award

The Guardians by Lucy Dougan has won the Western Australia Premier’s Award in the poetry category. The award ceremony took place at the State Library of Western Australia on 3 October.

Of the poetry collection, the judges said: ‘Seemingly simple, actually very dense poetry, Dougan’s elliptical work hints at a life that hovers just beyond our comprehension; in dreams, tales, the past, in the imagination of the poet. This other world surrounds even the most domestic of the poems. Often funny as well as serious, the work is at the same time mysterious and haunting.’

Read more about The Guardians on the website.

Alexis Wright wins the 2016 Kate Challis Award for The Swan Book

Alexis Wright has won the 2016 Kate Challis Award with her novel, The Swan Book.

In their citation the judges noted: ‘Alexis Wright’s The Swan Book is a sprawling, magnificent achievement, a remarkable imaginative vision of Australia as it was and is, and will be. Set at some point in the future, in a world utterly changed by global warming, war and the global movement of people, it charts the life of a mute young woman, Oblivian Ethel(ene), beginning with her fraught relationship with an old, enigmatic refugee, Bella Donna of the Champions. The novel is full of mythologies and soaring imagery: the swans, for example, are ever-present and say so much about the predicament of the world they inhabit. At the same time, the novel launches a devastating critique of Australia’s treatment of Indigenous people: condemning the Federal government’s Intervention, and showing us the many ways in which a militarised colonialism has shaped, and continues to shape, Indigenous lives in Australia’s north and across the nation.’

In 1994, Emeritus Professor Bernard Smith (late) established “The Kate Challis Award” to honour the memory of his late wife, Kate Challis, who was known in her youth as Ruth Adeney (RAKA is an acronym for the Ruth Adeney Koori Award). In the Pintupi language RAKA means ‘five’ and in the Warlpiri RDAKA means ‘hand’. The donor stipulated that the award be made annually and is to be applied to encourage Indigenous artists to undertake literary works, paintings, sculptures, craftwork, plays and musical compositions and to assist in advancing the recognition of Indigenous achievements in these areas.

To read more about the award, visit the website.

Ali Cobby Eckermann shortlisted for the 2016 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Indigenous Writing

Ali Cobby Eckermann’s collection of poems, Inside My Mother, is one of three titles shortlisted for the 2016 Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Indigenous Writing. The winner of the $20,000 award will be announced on 7 September, coinciding with Indigenous Literacy Day.

Of Inside My Mother, the judges said:

Inside my Mother is a haunting and evocative piece of writing from an extraordinarily gifted poet. Ali Cobby Eckermann has produced a deeply personal set of poetic moments, which are both inventive and classical. A raw and honest collection cut from bitter experience, Inside My Mother sometimes reads like a verse novel – except these moments might be ripped from the pages of another person’s life.

There is great empathy in these poems. The title suggests a primal longing for the mother, who is embodied in the birth trees that populate the country of the poet’s mind. Those birth trees, like the surreal dream birds, are both witness and sentinel to generations of mothers and daughters. There is nothing anaesthetic about these poems; they are brutal and affirming in their truth.’

To read more about the shortlist, visit the Wheeler Centre website.

Sean Rabin’s Wood Green has been shortlisted for The Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction

Wood Green cover for webWood Green by Sean Rabin has been shortlisted for the 2016 Readings Prize for New Australian Fiction. Now in its third year, the aim of the award is to recognise ‘exciting and exceptional new contributions to local literature’.

On Wood Green the judges commented: ‘Set in Tasmania, this is a charming, quirky and very clever debut novel, bursting with literary references and boasting a memorable cast of characters. A genuine pleasure to read.’

The winning author will be announced at midday on Tuesday 18 October, be featured in the November issue of the Readings Monthly, and will receive prize money of $4000.

To read more about the prize, visit the Readings website.

Lucy Dougan and Jennifer Maiden shortlisted for 2016 WA Premier’s Poetry Award

Maiden and Dougan WA Poetry
Two Giramondo poets have been shortlisted for the 2016 Western Australian Premier’s Poetry Award: Lucy Dougan for The Guardians and Jennifer Maiden for The Fox Petition.

The judges said of The Guardians: ‘Seemingly simple, actually very dense poetry, Dougan’s elliptical work hints at a life that hovers just beyond our comprehension; in dreams, tales, the past, in the imagination of the poet. This other world surrounds even the most domestic of the poems. Often funny as well as serious, the work is at the same time mysterious and haunting.’

On The Fox Petition: ‘Mostly long, often conversational poems between well-known political or public figures, Maiden’s poetry is sharp, witty and entertaining. Its focus is on rights of all kinds and for her the poetry is definitely, and defiantly, the political. While it often uses historical figures, the work is always marked by its contemporary significance and broad historical relevance.’

The prize-winners will be announced on Monday 3 October 2016.

For more information visit the website.

Fiona Wright winner of $30 000 Kibble Literary Award

Small acts of disappearance_Fiona WrightWe are excited to announce that Fiona Wright has won the 2016 Nita B Kibble Literary Award for her collection of essays, Small Acts of Disappearance. The Award, which is worth $30 000, celebrates female writers and their impact on life writing.

The judges said:

“With the skilful use of language seen in her prize-winning poetry, Wright writes frankly and movingly about a difficult and very personal subject. Unlike many memoirs of illness and recovery, hers is not a story of triumph over adversity. The essay form allows her to resist closure, while also providing insights into her reading, her travels and her interactions with others,” she said.

For more information visit this site.

Martin Edmond’s Battarbee and Namatjira Shortlisted for National Biography Award

Battarbee and Namatjira_Martin EdmondWe’re excited that Battarbee and Namatjira by Martin Edmond has been shortlisted for the National Biography Award.

The Award was established in 1996 by Dr Geoffrey Cains and is administered and presented by the State Library of NSW.

The total prize value is $31,000 – $25,000 for the winner and $1,000 each for shortlisted authors – making it the richest national prize dedicated to Australian biographical writing and memoir.

The winner is announced each year in August.

For the complete shortlist, click here.

Fiona Wright Shortlisted for the Kibble Award

Small acts of disappearance_Fiona WrightWe’re delighted that Fiona Wright has been shortlisted for the Kibble Award for Established Writers for her essay collection Small Acts of Disappearance.

Established in 1994, the Kibble Awards recognise Australian female literary talent in honour of Nita Kibble, the first female librarian of the State Library of New South Wales. They comprise the Kibble Literary Award for an established author, as well as the Dobbie Literary Award for a first time published author.

For the complete shortlist, click here.

Joanne Burns and Lisa Gorton Winners of NSW Premier’s Literary Awards

We’re delighted that two Giramondo authors received awards at the 2016 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards.

joanne burns won the Kenneth Slessor Poetry Prize for brush of which the judges said: ‘While apparently modest in scope this intrepid and original poetry’s achievement is considerable as the commonplace is excavated in all its multifarious dimensions.’

Lisa Gorton was awarded the People’s Choice Prize for The Life of Houses.

For the full list of winners and judges’ citations, click here.

Fiona Wright Shortlisted for the Stella Prize

Small acts of disappearance_Fiona Wright

We’re thrilled that Fiona Wright’s Small Acts of Disappearancehas been shortlisted for the Stella Prize.

The judges say:
Small Acts of Disappearance is a collection of essays on anorexia, a disorder as disturbing as it is mysterious, even to its own sufferers. Documenting Fiona Wright’s experience from the beginning of her affliction, when she was a student, to her hospitalisation with a life-threateningly extreme version of the illness, the essays display a candour and an intelligence that describe the course of her illness with great precision and illuminate the sufferer’s motives and actions over time.

The narrative is crosshatched with other experiences and subjects: travel, autobiography, and literature – in particular writers who have used their art to anatomise the extremity of compulsion. The range of Wright’s research, from contemporary neurobiologists to old school modernists, and the quality of her insights make Small Acts of Disappearance a valuable book. Wright brings a sometimes melancholy, sometimes comic, well-informed honesty to an important subject.’

For the full shortlist, click here.

Queensland Literary Awards Shortlistings

Lucy DouganWe are delighted to have two authors shortlisted for the Queensland Literary Awards.

Lucy Dougan’s The Guardians has been shortlisted for the Judith Wright Calanthe Poetry Prize and Nicholas Jose’s Bapo has been shortlisted for the Steele Rudd Short Story Prize.

For the full shortlist and winners, click here.

Felicity Castagna chosen for IBBY Australia Honour List

TiHan cover for webWe’re thrilled that Felicity Castagna’s The Incredible Here and Now has been chosen at IBBY Australia’s Honour Book for Writing.

Of Felicity’s work, the judges said:

Dom dies in a car accident. Fifteen-year-old Michael has to learn how to live without his older brother, whose easy charm could open any doors. In this life-changing year, while his mother withdraws from the family, Michael, despite his strong sense of self, becomes somehow disconnected from his world. This gives the story an edgy feel as we experience with him his neighbourhood, his girlfriend and the cars which zoom up and down the street. The novel has a powerful sense of place, exploring the setting and cultures of the western suburbs of Sydney that many readers can identify with. Castagna’s sharp, observant writing shows compassion and insight and explores the themes of grief, loss, romance, culture and family life through a series of vignettes. Many light touches of humour contribute to making this compelling and accessible book a story about hope and finding one’s place in the community.

For more information about IBBY Australia, click here.

Alexis Wright Awarded a Sidney Myer Creative Fellowship

Alexis Wright authorWe are delighted that Alexis Wright has been awarded a Sidney Myer Creative Fellowship.

First awarded in 2011, the Sidney Myer Creative Fellowships provide grants of $160,000 over two years to individual artists, arts managers and thought leaders in the humanities. For more information on the fellowships and other recipients, click here.

Jennifer Maiden awarded ALS Gold Medal

Alexis Wright authorWe are delighted that Alexis Wright has been awarded a Sidney Myer Creative Fellowship.

First awarded in 2011, the Sidney Myer Creative Fellowships provide grants of $160,000 over two years to individual artists, arts managers and thought leaders in the humanities. For more information on the fellowships and other recipients, click here.

Judith Beveridge Awarded Peter Porter Poetry Prize

We’re thrilled that Judith Beveridge has been awarded the Peter Porter Poetry Prize for her work, ‘As Wasps Fly Upwards’.

On winning the prize, Judith said:

I am deeply honoured to have won the Peter Porter Poetry Prize, not only because of the high regard I have for Peter Porter’s poetry and for Australian Book Review, but also because of the very strong 2015 shortlist. I loved all the poems and was truly surprised to hear I’d won. My sincere thanks to ABR for continuing this prestigious prize, which is a great support for poets.

For more information on the shortlisted poems, visit the ABR website, here.

Luke Carman wins NSW Premier’s New Writing Award 2015

Carman-CoverWe are delighted that Luke Carman has won the UTS Glenda Adams New Writing Award 2015 at the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards.

The judges had this to say of Luke’s work:

Luke Carman’s witty collection of stories heralds a new, edgy and brilliant voice in Australian fiction. The elegant young man of the title is a well-read, acerbic character who goes by the name of Luke Carman. Immediately the writer’s erudition and craft are on display. Here we have a portrait of the artist as a young western Sydney man, failing repeatedly the machismo tests set by the street thugs and dealers of suburbs with the postcode 2170.

Through his unpretentious, playful stream-of-consciousness, the protagonist charts his own odyssey from Liverpool Boys High and the western suburbs to the more genteel, sophisticated inner west. Carman offers a cartography of the multiracial — and at times violent and drug-and-booze fuelled — neighbourhoods of western Sydney, and a map of the protagonist’s reading life. Kerouac, Ginsberg, Tolstoy, Whitman, Dylan Thomas and Hemingway sit alongside Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Henry Rollins, Seinfeld and Penthouse.

Carman’s epigrammatic stories, so perfectly suited to Giramondo’s Shorts form, build in intensity and poignancy. After a rollicking, sometimes brazen and shocking romp through fraught geographical, cultural and racial terrain, we are left with the almost nostalgic suggestion that perhaps there can be no more true heroes – no great Ulysses – in our modern world. But, Carman suggests, you should not let that get you down. An Elegant Young Man shocks, delights, depresses and inspires.

For a full list of winners, click here.

Michael Mohammed Ahmad, SMH Best Young Novelist 2015, Voss Prize Shortlisting

Ahmad The Tribe Cover
We’re thrilled that Michael Mohammed Ahmad has been named one of the Sydney Morning Herald’s Best Young Novelists, 2015, for his book The Tribe. The judges said:

Ahmad tackles this difficult subject matter with breathtaking honesty, gesturing towards a larger social canvas beyond the mind of a child that includes the struggle of migration, economic disadvantage, the difficulties of reconciling elements of the old and the new culture. Ahmad’s language is replete with lyricism, and a sense of wonder suffuses every page. It turns everyday experience into the stuff of poetry.

For full details of the winners, click here. The Tribe has been shortlisted for the Voss Literary Prize. The prize is dedicated to the memory of Vivian Robert de Vaux Voss (1930-1963), an historian and lover of literature. His will stipulated that a literary award be established to reward the best work of fiction from the previous year. For more information and the full shortlist, click here.

Alan Wearne Honoured with Christopher Brennan Award

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We are thrilled that Alan Wearne has been lauded with the FAW Christopher Brennan Award. The award celebrates lifetime achievement in poetry and recognises a poet who produces work of ‘sustained quality and distinction’.

Judges Jennifer Harrison and Philip Salom had this to say in their citation:

Alan Wearne has been involved with the Australian poetry scene since the late sixties. After publishing two poetry collections, Public Relations (1972) and New Devil, New Parish (1976), he played a pivotal role in introducing the verse novel to mainstream Australian poetry with Out Here (1976) and The Nightmarkets (1986). The Nightmarkets won the Banjo Award and was adapted for performance. Wearne wrote a satirical novel on Melbourne’s football (Kicking in Danger 1997) and hosted Conversations with a Dead Poet — a documentary film on his friend the late poet John Forbes — before his next verse novel was published. That verse novel, The Lovemakers (2001), was awarded the 2002 NSW Premier’s (Kenneth Slessor) Prize for Poetry, NSW Book of the Year and the Arts Queensland Judith Wright Calanthe Award. The Lovemakers, Book Two was the co-winner of the 2004 Foundation for Australian
Literary Studies’ Colin Roderick Award. Alan Wearne’s most recent works are Sarsparilla: a Calypso (2007), The Australian Popular Songbook (2008) and Prepare the Cabin for Landing (2012). He is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Wollongong and publisher at Grand Parade Poets.

For a full list of winners and citations, click here.

Giramondo Titles Shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Award 2015

NSW prem's 2015

Giramondo is delighted to be well represented across three categories of the NSW Premier’s Literary Award 2015 shortlists.

In the Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry, Judith Beveridge’s Devadatta’s Poems and John Mateer’s Unbelievers or the Moor made the shortlist.

Michael Mohammed Ahmad’s The Tribe and Luke Carman’s An Elegant Young Man have been shortlisted for the UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing.

A Million Windows by Gerald Murnane has been shortlisted for the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction.

For a full list of shortlisted authors, click here.

For the full citations of all the Giramondo titles, click here.

Felicity Castagna wins the Prime Minister’s Literary Award

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We are thrilled that Felicity Castagna has won the Prime Minister’s Literary Award, Young Adult Fiction for her work The Incredible Here and Now. The award was presented at a gala dinner in Melbourne. For the full list of winners and shortlisted titles, click here.

SBS broadcast the event, to watch the video, click here.

The judges said:

When Michael’s beloved older brother Dom dies in a car crash, Michael and his family are left with aching grief. What an aptly titled novel this is: a vivid portrait of a teenage boy, his family and community in Sydney’s western suburbs learning about life, death and love. Writer Felicity Castagna exploits a series of vignettes to create a wholly satisfying, moving story: its short, sculpted chapters capture Michael’s thoughts, moods and insights in quickening moments. Michael has the outward reticence of a teenage boy, but so much happening beneath the surface. This is a splendid portrayal of a boy on the cusp.

Brian Castro Wins Patrick White Award

We’re delighted that Brian Castro has won the Patrick White Literary Award. This award is for an author’s body of work and was founded by White with the proceeds of his Nobel Prize for Literature. Giramondo has published four of Castro’s works, Shanghai Dancing, The Garden Book, The Bath Fugues and Street to Street.

The judges praised Castro for his ‘outstanding contribution to Australian Literature, his continued willingness to take imaginative risks and be ‘blackly playful’, and his evident potential to produce more significant work…’

For the full judges’ citation, click here.

To read Castro’s acceptance speech, click here.

Michael Mohammed Ahmad and Luke Carman Shortlisted for Readings New Writing Award

We’re thrilled that Michael Mohammed Ahmad’s book The Tribe and Luke Carman’s An Elegant Young Man have been shortlisted for the inaugural Readings New Writing Award. A prize offered for a first or second book by an Australian author, the award ‘aims to increase the promotion and commercial success of books by Australian authors, earning them greater recognition from the wider community’.

Ahmad The Tribe Cover
Of The Tribe, the judges said:

Told from the point of view of a child called Bani, The Tribe introduces the members of a Muslim family who fled to Australia just before the civil war in Lebanon, and the narrative progresses through key moments of their multi-generational household.

Set largely in the western Sydney suburb of Lakemba, The Tribe comes to life through the simple, honest voice of its young narrator. The suburban narrative is given a vivid cultural specificity not often depicted in contemporary Australian fiction, and Michael Mohammed Ahmad cleverly ties pop-cultural references to myth and traditional stories, creating rifts of humour and warmth in the work.

Carman-Cover
The judges said that of  An Elegant Young Man:

Luke Carman’s collection of monologues and anecdotal stories hums with the cadence of Western Sydney – a creative mash-up of street talk and literature, swagger and trepidation, colloquialisms and poetry. The world of Fobs, Lebbos, Greek, Serbs, Grubby Boys and scumbag Aussies that forms the backdrop to these stories is ominously familiar; a place where racism is so entrenched in daily interactions as to be barely discernible.

Through his narrator, described as anything but an elegant young man, Carman brilliantly captures the mingling anxieties and misplaced confidences of youth with a feverish intensity.

 

For the full shortlist, click here.

Lisa Gorton Awarded Philip Hodgins Medal

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At the Mildura Writers’ Festival this year, Lisa Gorton was awarded the Philip Hodgins Memorial Medal, an annual prize given to an Australian writer whose work reflects the standards and literary accomplishments that Philip Hodgins. Gorton’s most recent book published by Giramondo is Hotel Hyperion which has been shortlisted for the WA Premier’s Literary Award for Poetry.

Alexis Wright wins the ALS Gold Medal

Wright-Swan-coverAlexis Wright has been awarded the 2014 Australian Literature Society Gold Medal for The Swan Book.

The judges’ citation said:

Alexis Wright’s The Swan Book is a novel of serious political intent concerning the migration of stories, peoples, imaginations and cultures. Wright’s remarkable third novel is rightfully angry, necessarily challenging, deeply personal, and universally damning. The central plot line of The Swan Book follows the story of Oblivion Ethyl(ene), or Oblivia, a mute teenage girl who is the victim of a gang rape in her displaced and army-controlled Indigenous community. The narrative style is an extension of Wright’s Carpentaria, blending many dimensions and registers simultaneously; The Swan Book is satirical, humorous, folkloric, mythical, magical and scathing, and combines the literal and the metaphoric with virtuosic skill. The logic with which Wright connects some of the most pressing political issues of our time – Indigenous rights, intervention, climate change, refugee policy – is compelling, and her projection of these issues into a dystopian future reveals both their messiness and their urgency.

Luke Carman’s An Elegant Young Man was also shortlisted for the 2014 Australian Literature Society Gold Medal.

The Recluse Shortlisted for the Magarey Medal

juers-265x300We’re delighted that The Recluse, Evelyn Juers, has been shortlisted for the Magarey Medal.

The Magarey Medal for biography is a biennial prize of at least $10,000. The prize is awarded to the female author who has published the work judged to be the best biographical writing on an Australian subject in the preceding two years. The awarding of the prize is administered and judged by a panel set up by the Association for the Study of Australian Literature and the Australian Historical Association. The prize is very generously donated by Professor Emerita Susan Magarey.

For the full shortlist, click here.

Luke Carman – 2014 Sydney Morning Herald Best Young Novelist

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Photo: Peter Rae, Fairfax

We’re delighted that Luke Carman has been named one of the Sydney Morning Herald‘s Best Young Novelists in 2014 for An Elegant Young Man.

The judges said that ‘Carman’s prose blends literature and popular culture, punk and poetry, and transforms this rich seam of influence into his own contagious voice with an admirable disregard for the distinctions of high and low art.’

In her interview, Linda Morris uncovered that:

Originally Luke Carman’s An Elegant Young Man carried the title How to Be Gay, which was his neighbour’s suggested title when Carman first revealed he wanted to be a writer.

The mocking, says Carman, sums up the sharp edges of masculine culture in western Sydney and the fact that literature carries so little credibility in suburbia. Which was unfortunate for Carman as a nerdy kid with a head for books not boxing gloves. At six or seven he used to read as a form of self-defence to keep his night terrors at bay. Reading eventually gave him insomnia.

In this collection of short stories and monologues, Carman wanders the streets of Granville, Mount Pritchard and Liverpool, observing fist fights under street lights, showdowns at all-night kebab shops and girls who offer their love for the cheapest exchange.

For the full coverage, click here.

Congratulations Alexis Wright – The Swan Book shortlisted for the Miles Franklin

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Left to right: Cory Taylor, Fiona McFarlane, Alexis Wright
Photo: Janie Barrett, Fairfax Media

The Swan Book by Alexis Wright has been shortlisted for the 2014 Miles Franklin Awards. In their citation, the judges said

 At some future date, in an Australia ravaged by the effects of climate change, the first Aboriginal Prime Minister, Warren Finch (aka ‘god’s gift’), takes his ‘promise wife’, Oblivia Ethylene, from her home in the far north to live in a tower in a flooded and lawless southern city. On this scaffolding Alexis Wright builds her extraordinary novel, an epic, mythic and satirical tale that is a worthy successor to her previous prize-winning Carpentaria (2006).

Oblivia, who was gang raped as a child and cannot speak, is the guardian of the swans, which are the book’s presiding image of beauty and vulnerability. Oblivia’s guardians, in turn, are Aunty Bella Donna – a climate change refugee from Europe, who brings the girl to live with her, feeding her with swan stories from around the world – and an Aboriginal elder who calls himself the Harbourmaster.

The name of their dwelling place, Swan Lake, as well as the name of the Aboriginal elder’s pet monkey, Rigoletto, signal the witty mix of cultural icons that furnish Wright’s tale with global as well as local references. The narrative voice that Alexis Wright has crafted can span the languages of opera and popular song as well as rendering the rhythms and idioms of Aboriginal English – a complex, allusive narrative of speaking, singing, mourning and cracking jokes. The result is unlike anything we have heard before in Australian literature.

For the full citation, click here.

You can view the full shortlist here.

Judith Beveridge Honoured with the Christopher Brennan Award

Devadatta's Poems Beveridge HeadshotJudith Beverdige has received the FAW CHRISTOPHER BRENNAN AWARD. It is an award to honour an Australian poet who has written work of sustained quality and distinction.

The FAW supplies a specially-cast bronze plaque designed by Michael Meszaros. Each year, the recipient is selected by a panel of judges appointed by the FAW. Previous winners include Giramondo poets Fay Zwicky and Jennifer Maiden.

Beveridge’s latest book of poetry is Devadatta’s Poems, available here.

NSW Premier’s Shortlist 2014 – Castagna, Middleton and Wright

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We’re pleased to have three titles shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards. You can read the judges’ comments below.

 

Ephemeral Waters, Kate Middleton

Judges’ comments:
‘This long documentary poem tracks the Colorado River, a system in ecological crisis, in its entirety, as a geographical site and as a self-sustaining historical text. Ambitious and epic in scope – and reminiscent of William Carlos Williams’ ‘Paterson’, Eleni Sikelianos’ ‘The California Poem’, and of Laurie Duggan’s ‘The Ash Range’ – it is a comprehensive work of research, a record of the poet’s actual journeys along the river’s course, and an inspiring act of imagination.

Ephemeral Waters stimulates questions about the local versus the global, and what a poem of this scope would achieve if it were about the Murray River. This book encourages a reader to ask what the future would be like if such river systems collapsed entirely. In this way a poem set in the US speaks directly to Australian readers without didacticism. Kate Middleton manages to balance the emotive connection of people to land, and the contestation over land use, with a language that is empirical and occasionally minimal. Elsewhere the poetry is wonderfully eccentric in its cascading lineation. Its vocabulary is organic and analytic in its weaving of local American vernaculars, scientific nomenclature, and lyric phrasing. The book achieves a rich synthesis of the literary and mythological with the empirical matter-of-factness of the surveyor’s documents, observations and explorations of science and history, both natural and human. Kate Middleton’s very accomplished second book is a major tribute to an important river that so many depend upon.’

 

The Incredible Here and Now, Felicity Castagna

Judges’ comments:
‘The Incredible Here and Now might be a book about the demonised and the stereotyped, about powerlessness and the hidden injuries of class. It might be a book about protest masculinity and the senseless, foolish, sometimes dangerous things young men do to compensate for the experience of marginalization. It might be a book about death and grief, or a book about the excruciating and exhilarating awkwardness of first love. In fact, The Incredible Here and Now is about all these things.

In the summer he turns 15, Michael’s world threatens to implode when his “invincible” older brother dies. Grief-stricken, bored, aimless and confused, Michael seeks refuge in the streets, sites and people of his home, Western Sydney. It would have been easy to stray into melodrama or sentimentality, but The Incredible Here and Now pulls back just enough to allow Castagna to deliver a confident and well-controlled story. Elegantly crafted as a series of vignettes, Castagna’s writing is bold, compassionate and visceral. Her characters are real and flawed, and linger long after one has turned the final page – from the charming and exuberant Dom, to “the last man on earth” Shadi, to the tyrannical Mr Alloshi. But it is Western Sydney that perhaps leaves the most memorable impression on the reader. Vividly portrayed – “an everywhere-people kind of place” – Castagna humanises a place where “those who don’t know any better drive through the neighbourhood and lock their doors”. It is in the West where Michael ultimately finds hope, resilience and love, learning that “you can’t go back. There’s only moving forward”.’

 

The Swan Book, Alexis Wright.

Judges’ comments:
‘Set in the future in a post-climate-change apocalypse, The Swan Book is the story of a mute Aboriginal girl, Oblivion Ethyl(ene). Hauled from her burrow in the roots of a tree as a child, traumatised by rape, Oblivia is saved by the European émigré-crone, Bella Donna of the Champions. Driven from her own land by environmental catastrophe, Bella Donna fills Oblivia’s mind with epic legends of migratory swans, and soon the foetid swamp of their home begins to bristle with the arrival of thousands of black swans, drawn inexorably towards Oblivia. Then comes another emissary from distant lands: Warren Finch, soon to be Australia’s first Aboriginal president, come to claim Oblivia as his promised wife.

This wildly adventurous, operatic hallucination of a novel encompasses indigenous politics, climate change, European history, global migration, displacement and grief. It is a savage critique of contemporary government approaches to indigenous culture, achieved through its telescopic imagination, sly humour and soaring poetry. Sweeping through history, across continents and cultures – yet never losing touch with the grit of raw experience – The Swan Book is a work of thrilling ambition.’

 

You can view the full list of shortlisted titles here.

As a special offer, you can purchase all three shortlisted titles for the amazing price $60, including postage in Australia.

CBCA Shortlist – The Incredible Here and Now

TiHan cover for webWe are delighted that The Incredible Here and Now by Felicity Castagna has been shortlisted for the Children’s Book Council of Australia Awards in the Older Readers category.

Teacher resources and reading group notes can be found here.

To view all of the shortlisted titles, click here.

The Swan Book – Longlisted for the Miles Franklin, Shortlisted for the Stella

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The Swan Book continues to attract critical acclaim as it has been longlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award 2014.

For the full list of longlisted titles, click here.

The Swan Book has also been shortlisted for the Stella Prize. The judges said:

A hundred years into the future, when climate change has irreparably damaged the earth, a refugee from the frozen northern hemisphere called Bella Donna finds a mute teenage girl she names Oblivia and takes her to live with her on an old derelict warship in a dry, polluted swamp in northern Australia. Three new figures appear: a black swan, an Aboriginal elder who looks like Mick Jagger, and an archangel in a white Commodore. These five creatures anchor Alexis Wright’s brilliantly surreal and inventive novel about imagination and the power of story. It’s a  treasure chest of stories, fables, songs, myths and poems, containing a wealth of cultural references from across the globe. The Swan Book is also a furious and impassioned political fable, linking the fate of Aboriginal Australia to the trajectory of unstoppable global warming and employing the fathomless complexity of the living Aboriginal relationship to country as a way of exploring humanity’s connection to the earth.

If Wright’s last novel Carpentaria – the winner of the 2007 Miles Franklin Literary Award – was operatic in its scope and language, then The Swan Bookis even more so. Rich and deep in its imagery, fearless in its linguistic acrobatics and sweeping in its imaginative power, The Swan Book is at once a futuristic dystopia, a gorgeous artifact, and an urgent call to action.

For the full shortlist, click here.

To buy your copy, and find reading group notes and reviews, click here.

Liquid Nitrogen Wins Victorian Prize for Literature

maiden-coverWe’re delighted that Liquid Nitrogen by Jennifer Maiden was awarded the prize in the poetry category of the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards and also the overall prize, The Victorian Prize for Literature.

You can view the judges’ report here.

Read Gig Ryan’s in-depth review for the Sydney Review of Books here.

Jason Steger’s coverage of the prize for the Age can be found here.

Three Giramondo authors shortlisted for the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards

We are delighted to have three authors on the shortlist this year for the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards.

Fiction

The Swan Book, Alexis Wright

The judges described The Swan Book as:

A work of metaphysical and metaphorical originality, Wright has created a world where communication flows between ghosts, animals and humans, but it’s also frighteningly realistic, holding a mirror to the nation, allowing fiction to speak a truth about Indigenous issues that many Australian find difficult to confront. For all its gravity, though, it is wickedly funny, mocking the ‘realms of public sector abstract dialogue’, and it deepens the reader’s understanding of this ancient continent.

Poetry

Autoethnographic, Michael Brennan

Of Autoethnographic the judges said:

Brennan’s poems skate over the narrator’s plural and imagined pasts in unpredictable tones, echoing and vital. As autoethnography itself places the personal in the wider politicised world, so Brennan creates an un-unified un-stabilised life rendered through many lives, a cubist portrait of self / selves in vivid excursions through a mythologised yet recognisably contemporary era.

Liquid Nitrogen, Jennifer Maiden

In their citation, the judges wrote:

This book is explorative, not didactic, and these long poetical essays are studded with interruptions, repetitions of motifs and characters, and tangential obsessions that create a distinct world and rhythm, where art and politics insistently coalesce in vibrant tableaux. A brilliantly fertile imagination creates poetry that interrogates and refines thought.

For the full citations and the complete shortlist, click here.

All Giramondo Shorts now $19.95

nonfict-shortsNow all the Giramondo Shorts titles are available for the excellent price of $19.95 including postage. For a full list of the Shorts titles, click here.

carman berryAs a Christmas offer, you pick up the two latest Shorts, Ninety 9 by Vanessa Berry and An Elegant Young Man by Luke Carman for the special price of $35 including postage.

Liquid Nitrogen Shortlisted for the Griffin Poetry Prize

We are thrilled that Jennifer Maiden’s Liquid Nitrogen has been shortlisted for the Griffin International Poetry Prize.

The full judge’s citation reads:

Jennifer Maiden’s Liquid Nitrogen may very well be the most contemporary collection of poetry you’ll ever read. Over the course of these dense, obsessive, and allegorical long poems, Maiden has created an absurdist theatre of global politics in which the spirits of public figures from across the last century share the stage with politicians, terrorists, dissidents and fictional creations from our continuous present. Combining a free-wheeling, meditative style with crisp, lucidly elegant lines, Maiden’s philosophical verse investigates the poetics of narrativity itself, not only as mediated by the news on TV, but by the no-less ethically charged realm of art as well. An extended meditation on the uses and abuses of power, the moral gravity of Liquid Nitrogen is buoyed throughout by Maiden’s self-effacing sense of humor and her tenderness towards her grown daughter, Katherine, who stands at the heart of this collection. Epic in its scope and utterly eccentric in its approach, Liquid Nitrogen is a work of rare passion and unprecedented poetic achievement from one of Australia’s most prominent living writers, ‘alert to the point of twitching,’ like the ox to whom she likens herself on page one, who nevertheless ‘still tramples through the difficult.’ Suzanne Buffam

The other shortlisted books are:

Like a Straw Bird It Follows Me, and Other Poems Fady Joudah, translated from the Arabic, written by Ghassan Zaqtan

Night of the Republic, Alan Shapiro

Our Andromeda Brenda Shaughnessy

For full details, visit the Griffin Prize website here.

Gerald Murnane Special Offer – Inland

murnane_2Gerald Murnane is one of Australia’s most important living writers whose idiosyncratic and finely wrought fictions are capturing the attention of a new generation of readers.

Buy the newly republished Inland and receive two classic Murnane titles published by Giramondo for the special price of $60.

This discount of over 30% will get you Inland, Tamarisk Row and Invisible Yet Enduring Lilacs and includes free postage.

Poetry Pick ‘n’ Mix

poetry pick mix updated To celebrate the excellent poetry titles we have published in the last twelve months we are offering any three of our five most recent poetry titles for the special price of $45 with free postage in Australia. This discount of over 40% is for a limited time only.

The titles offered for this special selection are:

Unbelievers or ‘The Moor’, John Mateer

Ephemeral Waters, Kate Middleton

New Works on Paper, Luke Beesley

Goad Omen, Corey Wakeling

Hotel Hyperion, Lisa Gorton

Please return to this page to place your order.

Please specify in the comments/special instructions field at the checkout which three titles you would like to purchase.

Fill Your Stockings with Shorts

nonfict-shortsFor the book lover in your life, we’re offering a special Christmas discount on our Shorts series. Pick up three fiction titles – Anguli Ma by Chi Vu, Street to Street by Brian Castro and Varamo by Cesar Aira – for $50 with free postage.

Or for the non-fiction fan, we’re offering Eliot Weinberger’s Wildlife, Evelyn Juers’ The Recluse and Michael Wilding’s Wild and Woolley for $50 with free postage.

Please select from the drop-down menu below whether you would like the fiction or non-fiction pack.

To view the full series, click here.

Gig Ryan wins the NSW Premier’s Literary Award for Poetry

Gig Ryan’s New and Selected Poems was awarded the NSW Premier’s Literary Award for poetry. The judges described the collection as ‘uncompromising, intelligent and sophisticated’. For the full citation, click here.

John Mateer’s Southern Barbarians was shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards.

Jess Huon’s The Dark Wet was shortlisted in the inaugural Underrated Book of the Year Award.

Fiona Wright has been awarded the Dame Mary Gilmore Award for Knuckled. The decision was a unanimous verdict on the excellence of this collection. You can read the judges’ citation here.

We’re delighted that Gerald Murnane’s A History of Books and John Mateer’s Southern Barbarians have been shortlisted for the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards 2012.

In more good news, we’re thrilled that Kate Fagan has been shortlisted for the Age Book of the Year Awards for her collection First Light.

Earlier in 2012 we had two poetry collections nominated for the Prime Minister’s Literary Awards 2012. Gig Ryan’s New and Selected Poems and John Mateer’s Southern Barbarians. For more information and the full shortlist, click here.

Giramondo eBooks available now

 

Selected Giramondo titles are now available as eBooks, and can be purchased through (in alphabetical order):

AmazonBooki.shFishpond, iBooks, KoboEbooks.comEbrary, Netlibrary, Read How You WantOverdriveReadCloud

The digital editions offered are:

Brian Castro’s Street to Street

Alike Melike Ülgezer’s The Memory of Salt

Jess Huon’s The Dark Wet

Gerald Murnane’s Barley Patch and A History of Books

Evelyn Juers’ House of Exile

Tom Cho’s Look Who’s Morphing

Sara Knox’s The Orphan Gunner

Alexis Wright’s Carpentaria

Mireille Juchau’s Burning In

Brian Castro’s The Garden Book

Nick Jose’s Original Face and

John Hughes’ The Idea of Home

We are developing our digital publishing program. If there are any titles you would like to read on your device, please email Alice, alicegATgiramondopublishingDOTcom.