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Author note: Kate Middleton on Television

‘I have tried in this book to think about that time watching television not as escapism, but as, in some way, real experience – experience filled with memories and images and emotions that I carry with me into the real world.’ 

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Three vignettes from Paradise Estate by Max Easton

‘After some hectoring, Dale told them about the circumstances that lead to him being made redundant (‘who doesn’t wank at work?’ the eldest at the table said, and when the youngest was hesitant to support Dale, the older man yelled: “what are you a priest?!”). Dale laughed meekly with these people, who he felt a comfort with, a generation who had never picked him up on his behaviour.’

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Transcript: Jennifer Mills’s launch speech for The Idealist by Nicholas Jose

‘[Jose] is a serious writer with an internationalist outlook that is not extractive – a rare thing – but eternally curious…His work often has a sense of mystery that shows his generosity also extends to readers. He’s not rushing to solve the world for us, or explain it, but opening our eyes to its wonders and complexities.’

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Max Easton: a note on Paradise Estate

‘I tried to take notes and wrap a narrative around all these events, to find parallels by way of allegory, to satirise the process itself as I went, allowing the march of 2022 to dictate the progress of the book. It was much more of an experimental process than I imagined, and it took a lot of work to bring it into some kind of order.’

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Nicholas Jose: a note on The Idealist

‘Timor-Leste celebrated its twentieth anniversary as an independent nation in 2022. A new generation is writing their story now, with the future as a destination for hopes and dreams. It can be a happier ending. Let’s help with that.’ 

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Amy Crutchfield: a note on The Cyprian

‘This book is not named for an imaginary figure from myth, or a character consigned to history, but rather the force she represents. A force which persists – fierce, intractable and undiminished.’

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Transcript: Marion May Campbell’s launch speech for Chinese Fish

Chinese Fish is a brilliantly devised, comic feat of cultural resistance; a fantastically polyphonic verse novel majoring in riotously funny and heartbreaking ways, the minoritised experience of three generations of a Chinese family, who in the 1960s migrate from Hong Kong to Aotearoa / New Zealand, or, as white Australians hypocritically used to joke, the land of the wrong white crowd.’

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